Steven Basche

Steven Basche

I help you pass down your values, not just your assets.
  • Estate Planning, Probate, Elder Law ...
  • Connecticut
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Summary

Estate planning is not just for millionaires. You may not think you have an estate let alone any need for a plan, but if you have children, if you have things of value, if you own a home, you need an estate plan. An estate plan ensures that you decide who gets your hard earned assets, whatever their size or value-- not the government. Without an estate plan, your wealth , your estate will pass according to the state intestacy statute. Don't you want to decide to whom and when your assets should be distributed and not a probate court? Estate is planning how you direct to whom your property will be distributed and who will care for your minor children. Estate planning helps reduce tax liabilities, court costs, and attorneys' fees, and can minimize disputes after your death the loss of family members. We can also design your estate plan to deal with your possible future mental or physical incapacity, either through a trust or a durable power of attorney. In addition, we can guide you through many situations that come up in everyday life that have a legal angle. Whether you are buying or selling a home, starting, buying or selling a business, switching jobs and need a severance or non-compete agreement reviewed, dealing with a minor criminal mater or have been injured in a car accident, you should have a lawyer you can turn to for advice. If we don't have the expertise to help you, we will find someone who does. The bottom line is that we want to be your lawyer. You have a family doctor (now they call them primary care physicians); you should have a family lawyer. If you want the benefit of a lawyer with a combination of 30 years of far reaching experience, offering values-based, parent-centered estate planning, and a passion for helping clients, call or email Steve today.

Practice Areas
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
  • Elder Law
  • Business Law
  • Personal Injury
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    Major Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
    Are available
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Connecticut
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2nd Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Partner
Hassett & Geoge, PC
- Current
Principal
Law Offices of Steven M. Basche, LLC
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Of Counsel
Sabia, Taiman
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Partner
Jacobs, Walker, Rice & Basche, LLC
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Associate
Cohn & Birnbaum
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Associate
Schatz & Schatz, Ribicoff & Kotkin
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Education
University of Connecticut School of Law
J.D
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University of Connecticut School of Law Logo
Awards
AV Rating
Martindale Hubbell
AV Rating
Martindale Hubbell
AV Rating
Martindale Hubbell
AV rated since 2012
Professional Associations
Connecticut Bar Association
Member
- Current
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NAELA
Member
-
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Hassett & George, PC
Blog
Estate and Business Planning blog
Legal Answers
16 Questions Answered

Q. So CT probate charges a fee even though there are no assets to go through probate?
A: Yes, even though the court doesn't do much, when the tax return is filed to clear any possible lien on the property, the court will assess the probate fee.
Q. My dad died in Oct. 2017. My brother filed probate papers in March 2018. My brother died in 2020.
A: Yes, you have a claim against your brother's estate. Probate court where you father died should have copies of the various filings in your father's estate. They should show the amount you were entitled to and then you'd have to prove he kept that money and didn't pay it out to you. Then you can make a claim in your brother's estate, if there is one opened. If there isn't a probate opened for your brother, you can start one.
Q. My husband's brother passed away 5 years ago in CT, without a will.
A: First, my heart goes out to you in this difficult time. Now to answer the question. You and/or your daughter should be entitled to your husband's share of his brother's estate. Your husband was alive at the time of his brother's death, so he (or in this case his estate) is entitled to his intestate share. Your husband's share of the estate is part of his estate which will now pass either by his will or by intestate succession. Hope this helps.
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Contact & Map
Glastonbury Office
628 Hebron Ave.
Suite 212
Glastonbury, CT 06033
Telephone: (860) 651-1333
Fax: (860) 651-1888
Monday: 8:30 AM - 6 PM
Tuesday: 8:30 AM - 6 PM (Today)
Wednesday: 8:30 AM - 6 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 6 PM
Friday: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
Notice: Evening and weekend appointments available.
Simsbury Office
945 Hopmeadow Street
Simsbury, CT 06051
Telephone: (860) 651-1333
Fax: (860) 651-1888
Steven M. Basche, Estate Planning & Business Partner
Hassett & George, PC
628 Hebron Ave., Suite 212
Glastonbury, CT 06033
Telephone: (860) 651-1333
Cell: (860) 794-3451
Fax: (860) 651-1888