Leonard Robert Grefseng

Leonard Robert Grefseng

Experienced diligent general practice lawyer serving southern Middle Tennessee
  • Divorce, Family Law, Business Law...
  • Tennessee, Tennessee
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Summary

A native of Birmingham, Alabama, Mr. Grefseng attended the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) on an athletic scholarship (football) graduating, cum laude in 1979. He was named to the "Academic All South Eastern Conference" honor roll in 1978. Upon graduation, he attended law school at the University of Mississippi graduating in the top third of his class in May of 1982. Upon graduation, he served as the law clerk for Judge Roy Noble Lee of the Mississippi Supreme Court. He was admitted to practice law in the State of Tennessee in 1984 and relocated to Columbia, Maury County and has been engaged in the private practice of law since that time. Mr. Grefseng is a member and past President of the Maury County Bar Association, and a member of the Tennessee Bar Association. Mr. Grefseng is married to Melinda Grefseng (formerly Melinda F. Bunch), and they have one child, Samuel. Mr. Grefseng has participated in a number of civic activities including the past President of the Maury County Kiwanis Club, former Elder of Zion of Presbyterian Church (PCA), and former Director and past Chairmen of the Board of Zion Christian Academy.

Practice Areas
  • Divorce
  • Family Law
  • Business Law
  • Collections
  • Real Estate Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Personal Injury
Additional Practice Area
  • Car Accidents
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    Visa, Mastercard, Discover
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Tennessee
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Tennessee
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Education
University of Mississippi
J.D. (1982) | Law
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Honors: top third of Class
Activities: Moot Court Board
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University of Mississippi
B.A. (1979) | Public Administration
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Honors: Cum Laude
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Professional Associations
Tennessee State Bar # 010778
Member
Current
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Maury County Bar Association
Past President
- Current
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
1194 Questions Answered

Q. I live with my partner (not married) I have lived here for 3 yrs. He owns the house, I have no lease can he kick me out?
A: yes- but that does not affect your ownership or the management of the business.
Q. I am 49% owner can a 51% partner force me to disolve our LLC and keep using our business name for themselves?
A: Probably yes, but this will depend on the wording of your operating agreement. He will also be required to pay for the use of the business name, but putting a value on this and other aspects of the "good will" of the business can be difficult.
Q. Not by my choice, My 2 stepdaughters and i now own 1/3 each of the house that i have lived in for 30 thirty yrs...
A: Yes and No- your question is complicated. As to the sale of the property, yes, you can force them to sell and they will be entitled to one third of the net sale proceeds if your husband/their father died without a will. the more difficult part of the question is the part about deducting their "contribution expenses for the past 12 years..." - In some cases, a court will allow other reimbursements for taxes or improvements made during the time of co-ownership, but this will depend on the particular facts of each case. Consult an experienced real estate lawyer for advice on your situation.
Q. My granddaughter is living in filth and is being made to share her room with my daughter’s boyfriend’s son
A: If you have evidence ( proof for court, not just suspicions) that a child is being abused, you can file a petition ( a written request explaining your reasons and your proof) in Juvenile Court and a hearing will be scheduled where you can present the proof to the Judge. If you convinced the Judge that abuse or neglect has occurred, the judge can order a placement of the child to a different setting ( maybe you or some other relative or state custody). You should consult an experienced family law attorney to assist you.
Q. I want to get an annulment
A: Contrary to popular belief, under Tennessee law, the short duration of a marriage is not grounds ( a legal reason) for an annulment. An annulment is the procedure for having a marriage declared void/invalid because of some DEFECT in the marriage itself ( for example, underage parties, fraud or misrepresentation by one of the participants, lack of a proper license, a prior marriage still existing at the time of the ceremony, etc.). If it was a valid marriage, even if just for a brief time, the proper remedy is a divorce.
Q. I have been estranged from my wife for 17 years and need a divorce.
A: Probably not- you surely need a divorce, the problem is that in order for it to be "simple and uncontested" your wife must AGREE and sign paperwork. Your question says your haven't seen her in some time, so to get her to sign, you will have to find her and communicate. It's likely she will also want the divorce so it is possible that your divorce will be simple. But, you should not assume that going into the process. To the contrary, I think you should always assume that it will be difficult, so considered hiring an experienced divorce lawyer to advice and assist you.
Q. What is the percentage of child support in Tennessee on 2 kids?
A: Child support is no longer figured by a strict percentage of your income. Child support is now based on the monthly gross income of BOTH parents AND the number of days set forth in the parenting plan. There are other factors but the number of days and the parties' income are the most significant. There is a computer program called the "child support calculator " which can be download from the Tennessee Department of Childrens' services website which will walk you through the process.
Q. Can I apply for an agreed divorce if I have 160$ on my personal 401 k
A: yes, I assume you a re talking about the forms put out by the Supreme court that say they ( the forms) can't be used if you have retirement benefits. The retirement benefits are not the problem, the problem is that dividing the benefits usually requires complicated court orders called QDROs ( pronounced quad-dro) and it's basically impossible for non-lawyers to prepare a QDRO. However since you only have $160, you can easily effect a division of that by just giving your spouse $80. You MDA should recite whatever division that the two of you agree on,
Q. I let my ex wife move in to my spare room in hard times. How can I evict her?
A: In Tennessee, the procedure is to give her written notice to get out. If she was supposed to pay rent, she has 15 days to catch up the rent. Then you file in general session court a "detainer warrant" ( the court clerk will have a form for you to fill out). Actually, it sounds like she is not really a "tenant," since there was no rent and no written lease ( I assume) and therefor e, she is actually a "guest" who can be evicted at anytime. Unfortunately, law enforcement personnel often do not recognize the difference, so your only option is to follow the usual tenant eviction procedure. Another example of the truth of the saying "no good deed goes unpunished."
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Contact & Map
214 West 5th Street
Suite B
Columbia, TN 38401
USA