Gregory L Abbott

Gregory L Abbott

  • Consumer Law, Landlord Tenant, Collections ...
  • Oregon, Washington
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Biography

Protecting Consumers and Small Businesses in Oregon for Over 23 Years. Landlord-Tenant Matters, Debt Collection Issues, Wills/Probates/Estate Administration, Auto Accidents, Car Deals Gone Bad are All Mainstays of My Practice. Other Attorneys in Oregon Hire Me to Help - Shouldn't You Too?

Practice Areas
    Consumer Law
    Class Action, Lemon Law
    Landlord Tenant
    Evictions, Housing Discrimination, Landlord Rights, Rent Control, Tenants' Rights
    Collections
    Probate
    Probate Administration, Probate Litigation, Will Contests
    Personal Injury
    Animal & Dog Bites, Brain Injury, Car Accidents, Construction Accidents, Motorcycle Accidents, Premises Liability, Truck Accidents, Wrongful Death
    Animal & Dog Law
Fees
  • Contingent Fees
    I accept contingent fees in select cases after a thorough review
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Depending upon the case and the situation, I offer flat fees in some matters; contingent fees in some; and hourly rates in others.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Oregon
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Washington
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9th Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
Lewis & Clark Law School
J.D. (1993)
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Honors: AmJur Award in Alternate Dispute Resolution, Winner of Mock Trial Competition
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Knox College
B.A. (1975) | Anthropology
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Activities: On Student Government
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Consumer Law Northwest
Legal Answers
1035 Questions Answered
Q. Any regulations for a bank such as Chase to require both signatures if a check is made out to John Doe and Jane Doe?
A: They should require two signatures IF the check was made payable to one person and a second one. If it was just payable to the two names without the "and" included, then either could cash it with just their signature. Instead of "and", an "or" is legally implied.
Q. Is there a time limit on this where the tenant can recover damages?
A: There is always a time deadline for filing a claim. What it is depends upon what violation is being claimed and against who. 1 year is the statute for claims arising out of a residential rental agreement or Oregon's Residential Landlord Tenant Act. But negligence is 2 years. Other causes of action will each have their own.
Q. Had inspection then received a notice we have to pay for repairs normally associated with moving out due Aug 18 in full
A: The issue is not the timing - it is whether you are responsible for damage beyond ordinary wear and tear. If so, you likely owe the cost of replacement/repair. A landlord does not need to wait until you move out to do repairs. Indeed, many prefer to constantly keep their dwelling unit fully updated rather than allow it to slowly decay until a tenant elects to move out - which could be a decade or more from now. If you are responsible, then a landlord can immediately deduct the repair costs from any existing security deposit and require the tenant to restore the deposit to its full amount or they can simply bill the tenant now for the repairs. If the tenant fails to restore the security deposit or to timely pay for the repairs, the landlord simply issues a 30 day for cause termination notice, giving the tenant 14 days to pay or 30 days to get out. If they do neither, then the landlord simply files to evict in court. Your ability to pay, while obviously of critical importance to you, has nothing to do with your liability and obligation to pay. If you can't do that, and the landlord is unwilling to work out a payment plan with you, your landlord is not unreasonable for wanting to get you out and someone new in, who can pay the costs of their housing.
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Contact & Map
Consumer Law Northwest
6635 N. Baltimore Ave
Suite 254
Portland, OR 97203
Telephone: (503) 283-4568