Gregory L Abbott

Gregory L Abbott

  • Consumer Law, Landlord Tenant, Collections ...
  • Oregon, Washington
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Summary

Protecting Consumers and Small Businesses in Oregon for Over 23 Years. Landlord-Tenant Matters, Debt Collection Issues, Wills/Probates/Estate Administration, Auto Accidents, Car Deals Gone Bad are All Mainstays of My Practice. Other Attorneys in Oregon Hire Me to Help - Shouldn't You Too?

Practice Areas
  • Consumer Law
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Collections
  • Probate
  • Personal Injury
  • Animal & Dog Law
Fees
  • Contingent Fees
    I accept contingent fees in select cases after a thorough review
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Depending upon the case and the situation, I offer flat fees in some matters; contingent fees in some; and hourly rates in others.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Oregon
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Washington
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9th Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
Lewis & Clark Law School
J.D. (1993)
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Honors: AmJur Award in Alternate Dispute Resolution, Winner of Mock Trial Competition
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Knox College
B.A. (1975) | Anthropology
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Activities: On Student Government
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Consumer Law Northwest
Legal Answers
805 Questions Answered

Q. Pendleton, OR, Umatilla Co. Can a new landowner force already established tenants to enter a new month to month lease?
A: Yes, generally speaking a landlord can require a tenant to sign a new lease with proper notice. Many of the changes are likely possible anyway if the landlord issues them as Rules and Regulations with proper notice. Whether smoking changes is material enough to avoid being changed in a Rules and Regulations change is a close call in my opinion and a Judge could rule either way. Whether they could evict you for failure to sign, if they jump through the right notice hoops, now during Covid, is another close call and ultimately up to the Judge if it goes that far.
Q. What are my rights as a property owner? how do I evict someone who refuses to leave my propery?
A: If the dog bit anyone, you should report that to your local county animal control. If the dog bit at the command of a human, you should report that to your local police or sheriff. As to getting rid of him, you need to review everything with a local landlord-tenant attorney. IF you can establish a landlord-tenant relationship between you (and its legal definition is broader than you may think), depending upon the facts, you may be in a position to serve the person with a 24 hr written notice of termination and then file in court to have them evicted. IF you do not have a landlord-tenant relationship, then you are likely going to have to file in court to eject him instead of evicting him. Ejectment and Eviction are similar in their goals - get the person out, with the Sheriff's assistance if necessary - but how you get there legally is very different with ejectment normally taking longer and costing more than eviction. Neither, however, are do-it-yourself projects if you expect to win. Review everything with a local landlord-tenant attorney to determine how to best proceed. And yes, if the dog bites someone again without your having actively done something to try to have it removed, you might be sued. You also should check your homeowner's insurance policy to see if you coverage in that event. More and more insurance companies are limiting or totally excluding coverage for dog bites. Good luck.
Q. Does ORS Chapter 90 90.545 apply to all rental units, or only manufactured dwellings/floating homes?
A: By its own terms, it only applies to manufactured dwellings and floating homes.
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Contact & Map
Consumer Law Northwest
6635 N. Baltimore Ave
Suite 254
Portland, OR 97203
Telephone: (503) 283-4568