Gregory L Abbott

Gregory L Abbott

  • Consumer Law, Landlord Tenant, Collections ...
  • Oregon, Washington
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Biography

Protecting Consumers and Small Businesses in Oregon for Over 23 Years. Landlord-Tenant Matters, Debt Collection Issues, Wills/Probates/Estate Administration, Auto Accidents, Car Deals Gone Bad are All Mainstays of My Practice. Other Attorneys in Oregon Hire Me to Help - Shouldn't You Too?

Practice Areas
    Consumer Law
    Class Action, Lemon Law
    Landlord Tenant
    Evictions, Housing Discrimination, Landlord Rights, Rent Control, Tenants' Rights
    Collections
    Probate
    Probate Administration, Probate Litigation, Will Contests
    Personal Injury
    Animal & Dog Bites, Brain Injury, Car Accidents, Construction Accidents, Motorcycle Accidents, Premises Liability, Truck Accidents, Wrongful Death
    Animal & Dog Law
Fees
  • Contingent Fees
    I accept contingent fees in select cases after a thorough review
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Depending upon the case and the situation, I offer flat fees in some matters; contingent fees in some; and hourly rates in others.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Oregon
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Washington
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9th Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
Lewis & Clark Law School
J.D. (1993)
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Honors: AmJur Award in Alternate Dispute Resolution, Winner of Mock Trial Competition
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Knox College
B.A. (1975) | Anthropology
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Activities: On Student Government
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Consumer Law Northwest
Legal Answers
953 Questions Answered
Q. My landlord notified me via text message of a 5% rent increase on 7/5/21 to start 9/1/21.Despite me requesting for
A: You may wish to just stay quiet - and stop pushing for a written notice - since the notice is invalid both because it provides less than 90 days advanced notice and because it was not a written notice. The sooner the landlord realizes his error, the sooner he will correct it - and the sooner you will have to start paying increased rent. If he tries to enforce the notice, you may have claims against him. If you happen to be within the Portland city limits, you likely already have claims against the landlord, possibly up to three months rent, plus attorney's fees and court costs; perhaps even more. So definitely document everything as fully as you can and then consider reviewing everything with a local landlord-tenant attorney to determine what, if any, claims you may have and how to best proceed. Good luck.
Q. Can landlord kick me out if I get a restraining order on my live in boyfriend for domestic violence?
A: You need to review everything with a local landlord-tenant attorney. First, rent cannot be increased during your first year of tenancy, nor can it be increased more than 9.2% over any 12 month rolling period - both of which sound to be violated. Plus any rent increase requires at least 90 days prior written notice before it can be effective. There may be monetary penalties to the landlord for even trying this non-sense. As for evicting you because you are a victim of domestic violence, that too is unlawful. You are specifically protected unless you participated in criminal activity (e.g. both of you charged with domestic violence) or permitted the abuser to stay after being warned by the landlord to get rid of him due to the domestic violence. Your case may be complicated by the apparent connection to staying there as part of your employment but if you pay rent, you are almost assuredly a "tenant" within the meaning of the landlord-tenant statutes and would therefore be protected by them. So see a local attorney - it may mean money in your pocket. Good luck.
Q. Does my landlord need to notify me before starting construction on my building? Removing porches & siding.
A: It depends upon whether the landlord needs to enter your space. If so, at least 24 hrs advanced notice is required. Otherwise, no. Not clear what your point is re AC - of course your apartment was excessively hotter in July than in June. It was hotter outside and triple digit temperatures tend to leave apartment interiors warmer.
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Contact & Map
Consumer Law Northwest
6635 N. Baltimore Ave
Suite 254
Portland, OR 97203
Telephone: (503) 283-4568