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Gratia

Gratia "Grace" P. Schoemakers

GP Schoemakers, PLLC
  • Estate Planning, Probate, Arbitration & Mediation ...
  • Texas
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial MediaResponsive Law
Biography

With over 15 years of legal experience, Gratia goes to great lengths to ensure that every one of her clients, no matter the challenges they face, receives the compassion and respect they rightfully deserve. She is committed to personally guiding you through your legal journey, infusing it with her distinctive personal approach, empathy, and unwavering values.

Gratia has assisted numerous clients in crafting their Trusts & Estate Plans, adeptly represented them in both uncontested and contested Probate cases, and provided invaluable support in matters such as Divorce, Paternity, Visitation, Child Support, and Adoption cases. Furthermore, Gratia boasts extensive experience as a certified mediator, specializing in civil, probate, and family law disputes.

Practice Areas
Estate Planning
Guardianship & Conservatorship Estate Administration, Health Care Directives, Trusts, Wills
Probate
Probate Administration, Probate Litigation, Will Contests
Arbitration & Mediation
Business - Arbitration/Mediation, Consumer - Arbitration/Mediation, Family - Arbitration/Mediation
Business Law
Business Contracts, Business Dissolution, Business Formation
Family Law
Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Father's Rights, Guardianship & Conservatorship, Paternity, Prenups & Marital Agreements, Same Sex Family Law
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    All major credit cards accepted
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Most of our services are flat fees for non-contested cases, price is agreed in advance, so there are no surprises. All contested cases are hourly and require retainers.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Texas
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Languages
  • Dutch
  • English
Professional Experience
Founder/Attorney
GP Schoemakers, PLLC
- Current
Intern
Pfizer, Patent Department
Legal Intern
U.S District Court, Eastern District of Missouri
Education
Washington University School of Law
J.D. (2008) | Law
Washington University School of Law Logo
Washington University School of Law
LL.M. | IP & Technologies Law
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Washington University School of Law
LL.M. (2005) | Contracts and Business Law
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Maastricht University, Faculty of Law
Doctorate (2004) | Dutch & European Law
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Maastricht University, Faculty of Law
LL.M. (2004) | International Law and Legal Studies
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Awards
Excellent Rating
Avvo
Client Champion - SILVER
Martindale-Hubbell
Professional Associations
American Bar Association
Member
Current
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State Bar of Texas
Member
Current
Activities: Real Estate, Probate and Trust Section; Business Law Section; Family Law Section
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Texas Bar College
Fellow
Current
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Bay Area Bar Association
Member
Current
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Collaborative Divorce Texas
Member
Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
Is your Estate Plan Outdated?
Avvo Legal Guide
Do I need a business plan?
Avvo Legal Guide
What does a Business plan cover?
Avvo Legal Guide
What to keep in mind when choosing your legal entity...
Avvo Legal Guide
Speaking Engagements
Discover how to make sure you have the Greatest Form of Self Care Possible For Your Business, Business Entrepreneurs Networking
LIFT your business, GP SCHOEMAKERS, PLLC
Basic Estate Planning & Guardian, Parent Workshop
Certifications
Certified Mediator in Civil, Probate, and Family Law
Websites & Blogs
Website
Blog
GP Schoemakers, PLLC
Legal Answers
8 Questions Answered
Q. When writing to companies about late husbands benefits can this just be ignored?
A: Without knowing the situation, it is possible the accounts had a Beneficiary designation on there that was NOT you.

If the money went to someone else, you have no right to know about this, as you are not the beneficiary.

If the accounts had no beneficiary, then you should go through probate and get Letters Testamentary (if there is a will), or Letters of Administration (if there is no will).

Just because someone is refusing to talk to you, doesn't mean that something fishy is going on, or that you have the right to the information.
Q. Do I need to set up a separate bank account for a living revokable trust?
A: It is unclear what you mean with "separate account." For a trust to be property funded (i.e. all assets are moved into the trust name), a trust will need to have a bank account in the trust name.

So presuming you mean "separate account" from your "personal account", then YES. If assets are not funded into the trust, the trustee has no power/"management rights" over those accounts.
Q. Is the purchase of a property protected in Texas during a marriage if the source of the funds from inheritance?
A: In Texas, property acquired during a marriage is typically considered community property and is subject to division upon divorce. However, there are exceptions to this general rule, particularly concerning inheritance.

If one spouse receives an inheritance, those funds are generally considered separate property, not community property. This means that the inheritance belongs solely to the spouse who received it, regardless of whether they were married at the time they inherited the funds.

If the inheritance is kept separate and not comingled with community property, it remains separate property. This distinction is crucial in cases of divorce. However, if the inherited funds are mixed with community funds (for example, by being deposited into a joint bank account) or used to purchase assets held in both spouses' names, those funds or assets might be considered at least partly community property.

In your scenario, if the husband used his inheritance to purchase property and kept the title to that property in his name alone without commingling the funds with community assets, the property is likely to be considered his separate property in the divorce. However, this can vary based on specific circumstances, such as improvements made to the property with community funds or contributions by the non-inheriting spouse that increased the value of the property.

Even if the house is considered community assets, there could be an offset in the calculation of the division of assets.

It's advisable to consult with a legal professional who specializes in family law in Texas to get specific guidance based on the full details of the situation.
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Contact & Map
GP Schoemakers, PLLC
1100 E. NASA PARKWAY
Suite 420J
HOUSTON, TX 77058
Telephone: (832) 408-0505
Fax: (832) 632-4949
Monday: 8 PM - 6 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 6 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 6 PM (Today)
Thursday: 8 AM - 6 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 6 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed