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Trent Harris

Trent Harris

Bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, and probate lawyer in Jackson, MI
  • Bankruptcy, Collections, Estate Planning...
  • Illinois, Michigan
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Summary

I'm a bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, and probate lawyer practicing in Jackson, Michigan. Born and raised in Jackson, Michigan, I've been a lawyer since 2008 and have spent most of that time in private practice as a solo practitioner. I also have worked several years working for a bank as in-house counsel handling debt collections and Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy matters.

I help individuals and families plan for and navigate legal issues in some of the most significant financial and legal events in their lives: births, deaths, marriages, divorces, job losses, illnesses, hospitalizations, long-term-care, and other major life events. My approach to clients features personalized attention, prompt communication, efficient service, and discretion at all times. I am admitted to practice in all state and federal courts in the State of Michigan.

Memberships:
Jackson County Bar Association
Chicago Bar Association
Jackson Area Estate Planning Council
Probate and Estate Planning Section, Michigan State Bar
Consumer Law Section, Michigan State Bar

Education:
J.D., Chicago Kent College of Law, 2008
B.A., Albion College, 1999
Diploma, Jackson High School, 1995

Practice Areas
  • Bankruptcy
  • Collections
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    I offer free consultations by telephone.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Illinois
Michigan
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Attorney
Crossroads Legal, PLLC
- Current
Founded consumer law firm to represent individuals in the areas of bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, probate, and employment law.
Collections Attorney
American 1 Credit Union
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I represented the credit union in collections and consumer bankruptcy matters in courts throughout Michigan.
Attorney
Law Office of Trent Harris, PLC
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I represented clients in estate planning, probate, real estate, and small business matters, mostly for transactional/drafting matters, but also some litigation.
Legal Intern
Allegiance Health
-
Worked as a legal intern supporting the Associate General Counsel of a mid-size regional hospital system. Worked mostly on contract and compliance matters.
Paralegal
Scarpelli & Brady, LLC
-
Worked as a paralegal for a five-attorney insurance defense litigation firm in Park Ridge, Illinois.
Education
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
J.D. (2008)
-
Albion College
(1999) Dual major in Economics & Management and Philosophy
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Honors: Cum Laude
Awards
CALI Award
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Received CALI Award for Law 273 - Evidence from professor Justice David A. Erickson for spring semester of 2007.
Dean's List
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Recognized on Dean's List - spring 2007 and fall 2007 semesters.
Dean's List
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Recognized on Dean's List - Fall 2006 semester.
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan # P73799
Member
Current
Jackson County Bar Association
- Current
Chicago Bar Association
- Current
Speaking Engagements
Bylaws are Mylaws, Nonprofit Network 2011 Governance Workshop, Community Action Agency, Jackson, MI
Nonprofit Network
Presentation discussing the role, relevance, and importance of bylaws to the board of directors and management of nonprofit organizations.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Crossroads Legal, PLLC
Legal Answers
102 Questions Answered

Q. Can my stepmother put my deceased fathers' assets in her name after probate court grants her personal representative?
A: Under Michigan law in the situation you describe the surviving spouse gets the first $100,000, plus 1/2 of the rest of your father’s estate. The remaining 1/2 goes to children of the decedent. If and when the stepmom dies, her share of your father’s estate would go to whoever she leaves in her will, or her heirs under intestate succession. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. In Michigan, it is my understanding that the probate proceedings must occur in the county where the individual died.
A: Venue for a decedent who dies in Michigan depends on whether they were domiciled here (i.e., Michigan was the place where they had their home, with intent to remain indefinitely). If the decedent was domiciled in Michigan, then venue is in the Michigan county where the decedent had their domicile. If the decedent was not domiciled here, then venue for estate proceedings is in a Michigan county where property of the decedent was located at the time of death. MCL 700.3201(1)(b) This administration extends to all assets in Michigan, even if some items are located outside the county where probate proceedings were commenced. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on any information you get on internet discussion boards, such as this one.
Q. How do I get back an engament ring I thing it has been pond
A: An engagement ring in a pond may be located using a metal detector. Or an engagement ring in a pawn shop might be reclaimed with proof of being the rightful owner. If you think it’s stolen, you could file a police report. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. I have payday loans from couple years ago. I want to file bankruptcy can i include them?
A: Yes. When you file bankruptcy you are supposed to list all of your debts, regardless of whether you want to “include” them in your bankruptcy or not. Payday loans are usually unsecured loans, and would be able to be discharged along with your other general unsecured debts. You’ll need to file bankruptcy in the place where you’ve lived for the last 180 days or majority of that time - sounds like Ohio for you. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. I was wondering if there was a way to get a list of debt that I owe?
A: Yes, there is a way. First, pull a copy of your credit report. You can get a free copy of your credit reports from the 3 major Credit Reporting Agencies (Experian, Transunion, and Equifax) from the site http://annualcreditreport.com. This will give you an ideas of any debts that are being reported under your name. Second, review your files (whether physical or electronic) to see who you have bought goods or services from. If you suspect you didn't pay their bills, you could call the vendor or service provider and ask for a statement of your account. This could be doctors, hospitals, credit card bills, cable bills, cell phone, etc. Third, if you've been getting collection letters, you could call the collection agency and ask them to give you a list of accounts that are due. These things should get you off to a good start. But as always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on any information you get from internet discussion boards, such as this one.
Q. Want to start a Property Management Company in MI where I would purchase & rent the properties. What's required?
A: Business savvy and real estate management experience would be a good start. If you have those, you will be exposed to the various ownership entities real estate investors use to acquire and operate rental properties. You would have agreements and requirements for various independent contractors and trades who will work at your buildings to maximize the quality and accountability of their work, make sure they carry appropriate insurance coverages which contain additional insureds designations in your favor, and to avoid liability caused by poor work or mechanic’s liens for failure to pay subcontractors, suppliers, and materielmen. You would want to have a good lease between you and your tenants, to incentivize taking care of the property and paying the rent on time, while providing clarity for unwanted conduct and teeth to enforce violators. If you will be getting into residential or comemercial properties, or both, you’ll want to be familiar with the differences in what can be in a commercial lease, versus a residential one, and what types of insurance you should ask various types of tenants to carry and give you proof of. You would want to be familiar with employment law areas for whether you will have maintenance personnel who are independent contractors or employees, and how not to create employment liability, or workers comp liability where you don’t intend for it. You’ll want to work with a bank to possibly help you with an operating line of credit, so you can have access to financing to maintain liquidity and capital to do more deals for new properties. You’ll want to work with an accountant to do payroll, employment taxes, estimated tax payments for you, and income taxes for you and the business. And of course, you’ll need a lawyer to help you with all of these things. These are some of the considerations in starting as a real estate investor. As to any specific legal requirements you’ll face, it depends. We don’t know much about your plans based on your question. So unfortunately at this point, I can’t be more specific with you. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. How does one "probate an estate" in Greene Co, AL?
A: You would need to call an attorney in Greene County, AL to help you, or find an attorney in Michigan who is also licensed in Alabama. This discussion board is for Michigan probate and real estate law, and a Michigan attorney generally is not going to want to give you advice about another state’s laws.
Q. How do I protect my personal equipment & property from being inventoried & claimed as my Dads trust personal property?
A: I’ll try to make this brief. If your disgruntled brothers lawyer up and you don’t, yes as to #1 and maybe as to #3. If you lawyer up, the answers are the same but you will have a better chance of it. Here’s my take: You said that the three of you owned the real estate as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. You do not state whether the land was placed in the trust or not. For my answer, I will assume that it was not. If mom and dad have both passed away and the real estate was not in the trust, then you don’t have to worry about losing the real estate or your home. But as to the personal property, there could be a genuine dispute as to whether it was in the trust or not. As far as question #2, proof of who owns what, receipts, registrations, and certificates of title are the best evidence. Usually, but not always, whoever pays for something is the owner. So if you can get copies of invoices and receipts for your stuff, you’ll have a better go at it. Try going back to the people and businesses you bought the items from. They may have kept records even if you didn’t. Or, you could get a statement from someone verifying that on such and such date, you paid them for this item or that item. Lastly, talk to an attorney. It sounds like you may end up in litigation. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. Can my 82 year old Mother break her auto lease and not be liable for the early return if she is going blind?
A: If there is some sort of medical hardship language in the lease that says she can, then yes. If not, no. I would think such a provision would be extremely rare in most commercial auto leases. It’s not a risk most commercial lessors would want to take. Please refer to the terms of the lease to be sure. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
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Contact & Map
Mailing Address
P.O. Box 1054
Jackson, MI 49204-1054
USA
Telephone: (517) 240-4236
Office
404 S. Jackson St.
Jackson, MI 49201
USA
Telephone: (517) 240-4236