Free Consultation: (517) 240-4236Tap to Call This Lawyer
Trent Harris

Trent Harris

Bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, and probate lawyer in Jackson, MI
  • Bankruptcy, Collections, Estate Planning...
  • Illinois, Michigan
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial Media
Summary

I'm a bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, and probate, lawyer practicing in Jackson, Michigan. Born and raised in Jackson, Michigan, I've been a lawyer for nine years and have spent most of that time in private practice as a solo practitioner. I also have worked several years working for a bank as in-house counsel handling debt collections and Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy matters.

I help individuals and families plan for and navigate legal issues in some of the most significant financial and legal events in their lives: births, deaths, marriages, divorces, job losses, illnesses, hospitalizations, long-term-care, and other major life events. My approach to clients features personalized attention, prompt communication, efficient service, and discretion at all times. I am admitted to practice in all state and federal courts in the State of Michigan.

Memberships:
Jackson County Bar Association
Chicago Bar Association
Jackson Area Estate Planning Council
Probate and Estate Planning Section, Michigan State Bar
Consumer Law Section, Michigan State Bar

Education:
J.D., Chicago Kent College of Law, 2008
B.A., Albion College, 1999
Diploma, Jackson High School, 1995

Practice Areas
  • Bankruptcy
  • Collections
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    I offer free consultations by telephone.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Illinois
Michigan
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Attorney
Crossroads Legal, PLLC
- Current
Founded consumer law firm to represent individuals in the areas of bankruptcy, collections, estate planning, probate, and employment law.
Collections Attorney
American 1 Credit Union
-
I represented the credit union in collections and consumer bankruptcy matters in courts throughout Michigan.
Attorney
Law Office of Trent Harris, PLC
-
I represented clients in estate planning, probate, real estate, and small business matters, mostly for transactional/drafting matters, but also some litigation.
Legal Intern
Allegiance Health
-
Worked as a legal intern supporting the Associate General Counsel of a mid-size regional hospital system. Worked mostly on contract and compliance matters.
Paralegal
Scarpelli & Brady, LLC
-
Worked as a paralegal for a five-attorney insurance defense litigation firm in Park Ridge, Illinois.
Education
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
J.D. (2008)
-
Albion College
(1999) Dual major in Economics & Management and Philosophy
-
Honors: Cum Laude
Awards
CALI Award
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Received CALI Award for Law 273 - Evidence from professor Justice David A. Erickson for spring semester of 2007.
Dean's List
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Recognized on Dean's List - spring 2007 and fall 2007 semesters.
Dean's List
Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology
Recognized on Dean's List - Fall 2006 semester.
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan # P73799
Member
Current
Jackson County Bar Association
- Current
Chicago Bar Association
- Current
Speaking Engagements
Bylaws are Mylaws, Nonprofit Network 2011 Governance Workshop, Community Action Agency, Jackson, MI
Nonprofit Network
Presentation discussing the role, relevance, and importance of bylaws to the board of directors and management of nonprofit organizations.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Crossroads Legal, PLLC
Legal Answers
77 Questions Answered

Q. How do I get appointed administrator of my daughters estate in Michigan but still use Transfer by Affdavit
A: You can’t do both either or. To use the affidavit procedure, there can’t have been a probate estate opened, and you are certifying that one isn’t going to be opened. If the insurance co. will accept an Affidavit of Decedent’s Successor for Delivery of Certain Assets, do that. If they won’t accept one, then you’ll need to open an estate but maybe you can close it quickly using summary administration procedures. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. My father passed and all he has is debt - as his only kid am I on the hook for them?
A: No. Not unless you were a co-signer on the debt with him. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. Am I still next of kin if my dad signed his rights of but been in my life for the last 15 years I am his blood.
A: It sounds like you’re asking whether you can still inherit from your natural father under the laws of intestate succession, even if his parental rights were terminated. The answer is yes, as long as you weren’t adopted by someone else. If you were never adopted, you can be an heir and still inherit from your natural father despite the termination of parental rights. But if someone else adopted you, then you can only inherit from your adoptive parent(s). Exception: if the person who adopted you was your step father, married to your natural mother, then you can be an heir and inherit from both of your natural father and your step father (and your mother). As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. My grandma died. She recently had a new will drawn with her lawyer, but the signed and notarized copy was in her home,
A: It sounds like maybe you’re interested in a will contest. If your aunt did what you suggest, you would need some proof. Nevertheless, the attorney who drafted the new will probably has a copy, even if it’s not the original. Ask the attorney for a copy of the will, and if the will that is presented to probate is different (ie a former, revoked will) then the battle lines are drawn. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. My brother signed up to be personal rep for our dad's estate before I could. How would I dispute this?
A: It depends on whether your father had a will. If your father had a will and it named your brother to be the personal representative, you can't really dispute it, unless for some reason you can show your brother is unfit to serve. Even if the court thought he might be a little shady, they could require him to get a financial bond to protect the estate. But to have him removed would require some serious allegations - like a history of financial crimes. If your father didn't have a will, then you and your brother have equal priority for appointment as personal representative. For him to be appointed, he would ordinarily need to either: (1) get you to renounce your priority for appointment (I'm assuming you didn't do this); or (2) send you notice of his intent to seek appointment as personal representative, served upon you by first-class mail, under which you would have 14 days to respond and ask to be appointed as personal representative instead. If the 14 days hasn't passed, then you can file a petition for formal proceedings to have yourself appointed personal representative, or you can file an application for informal appointment to have yourself appointed personal representative. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on any information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. if property listed in a trust is sold prior to owner's death, does the requested division of proceeds still apply?
A: That’s probably right. The account would only be divided according to the terms of the trust if the account were owned by the trust. If the account was in the name of the person who died, not the trust, then the trust didn’t own it and the account passes according to the terms of the account (if it’s TOD or has a payable-on-death beneficiary), or under the person’s will. If the person did not have a will, then the account will pass according to the laws of intestacy. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. I paid off a bill directly with the hospital, but their collection agency keeps calling me - can I take them to court?
A: Maybe. You would want to make sure that the hospital has had a chance to tell the collection agency that your bill has been paid (this could take a couple business days). Also, you would want to make sure that the bill the collection agency is calling you about is the same one that you paid off. These kind of misunderstandings/miscommunications happen, so if you want to sue, you should make a paper trail. Send the collection agency a letter by certified mail, return receipt requested, and tell them you've paid the bill and enclose proof of your payment. This could be a payment receipt from the hospital, a credit card receipt, or a canceled check. If the collection agency continues to harass you about the same bill after they sign for your certified mail return receipt, then sue away. You would basically be alleging a violation of the Fair Debt Collection Procedures Act (FDCPA). As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on any information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. Can I convert a chapter 13 to a chapter 7? What are the first steps?
A: You can file a Notice of Conversion with the court and pay a conversion fee. However, keep in mind that you must still qualify for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in order to complete your case and receive a discharge. There are more steps than are listed here. It would probably be best for you to work with an attorney to help you get this done. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on any information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Q. We're a small business and would like to advertise locally - what kind of consumer laws for ads should we be aware of?
A: It depends on what your business is selling. But generally, you should refrain from any advertising that is false or misleading, or that makes defamatory comments about your competitors and their products. Beyond that, you’ll need to be specific about the kind of business you’re in before anyone can answer this question for you. As always, you get what you pay for. Be sure to talk to a qualified attorney about your specific situation before choosing to rely on information you get from internet discussion boards such as this one.
Click here to see all answers
Social Media
Contact & Map
Mailing Address
P.O. Box 1054
Jackson, MI 49204-1054
USA
Telephone: (517) 240-4236
Office
404 S. Jackson St.
Jackson, MI 49201
USA
Telephone: (517) 240-4236