David Allan King

David Allan King

  • Business Law, Divorce, Trademarks
  • North Carolina
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Summary

I provide legal services outside the courtroom for things like contracts, filings, legal documents, and disputes. Most of my clients are businesses, spouses, or prospective litigants.

For spouses, some of my most common services are for separation agreements, prenups, divorce filings, and/or an accounting that recommends specific financial terms in a divorce.

For businesses and non-profits, some of my most common services are for trademark registrations, contracts, operating agreements, terms of use, company formation, and other matters.

For prospective litigants, I often attempt to resolve disputes before they go to court and/or provide legal documents like demand letters, motions, briefs, etc. However, I do not provide general legal representation in courtroom matters.

Practice Areas
    Business Law
    Business Contracts, Business Dissolution, Business Finance, Business Formation, Business Litigation, Franchising, Mergers & Acquisitions, Partnership & Shareholder Disputes
    Divorce
    Collaborative Law, Contested Divorce, Military Divorce, Property Division, Same Sex Divorce, Spousal Support & Alimony, Uncontested Divorce
    Trademarks
    Trademark Litigation, Trademark Registration
Additional Practice Area
  • Contracts, Prenups, and legal research/writing
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
North Carolina
North Carolina State Bar
ID Number: 54884
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Denny's Corporate
Wrote revised privacy policy for then-upcoming privacy legislation. Worked on modifications to proxy statement. Reviewed contracts with suppliers.
Education
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
J.D. (2019) | Law
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Awards
3rd Place in National Essay Competition
Center for Alcohol Policy
Top ten in moot court tryouts for negotiations
UNC Law
Professional Associations
North Carolina State Bar
Member
Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
Putting the Reins on Autonomous Vehicle Liability: Why Horse Accidents Are the Best Common Law Analogy
North Carolina Journal of Law & Technology
Certifications
Attorney Licensing
North Carolina Bar Association
Websites & Blogs
Website
King @ Law Website
Legal Answers
18 Questions Answered

Q. I am 15 earning over $85k/year post tax. Can I move out at 17 with parental consent?
A: I may have a different perspective as more of a business attorney. I imagine it being difficult to run a business of that size when you don't have the right to sign binding business contracts as a minor; rights that are granted upon emancipation. In fact, quite a few difficulties come to mind: forming an LLC, finding anyone willing to lease an apartment to a minor knowing the minor isn't necessarily bound by the lease agreement, and so on. It also sounds like you would have strong arguments for emancipation, once you turn 16. You can find North Carolina's emancipation statutes for reference at: https://www.ncleg.gov/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/HTML/ByArticle/Chapter_7B/Article_35.html In any case, if you moved out against your parents' wishes, they may call the police and have you returned to them. If your parents are ok with it (they would probably have to co-sign your lease anyway), then it just depends on if anyone bothers you.
Q. Hi, I entered into an agreement to purchase a modular with a stick built roof from a local GC. They initially requested
A: It's difficult to say without doing a full consultation that includes reading the contract and getting more information. However, as a general matter, a successful breach of contract claim will include the cost of lost profits. This is because the court is trying to put the plaintiff in the same position they would have been in if the contract was complied with, and compliance with the contract would have resulted in profits. Your perspective seems to be that you want to put them in the same position as though the contract was never signed, but this is not the law.
Q. My Ex has recently been arrested & I'm wanting to divorce him but it hasn't been a complete year yet can i say it has?
A: It is very common but not recommended.
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Contact & Map
6613 Hammersmith Drive
Raleigh, NC 27613
Telephone: (919) 706-5322