Cynthia Ariel Conlin

Cynthia Ariel Conlin

Lead Attorney at Cynthia Conlin & Associates
  • Consumer Law, Communications & Internet Law, Intellectual Property...
  • Florida
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Summary

In 2010, after litigating at a downtown Orlando firm, Cynthia Conlin founded her own law firm with a desire to serve clients on a more personal and direct level. One of the things that drew Cynthia to practicing law was the desire to serve people. The practice of law, stripped to its core, means helping people. In practice, Cynthia spends her days helping clients. Before law school, Cynthia wore several hats, including journalist, graphic designer, publisher, and entrepreneur. From her diverse creative and business background, she was quickly drawn to areas of copyright law, defamation, Internet law, and business law. Cynthia has grown her practice to focus on litigation and enjoys the relationships she forms with her clients. Her firm, Cynthia Conlin & Associates, works as a team and focuses on all aspects of litigation. When she is not in law school, Cynthia enjoys Irish culture and is a founder of the Irish American Chamber of Commerce Florida. She also enjoys Toastmasters, Orlando City Soccer, and spending time with friends and family.

Practice Areas
  • Consumer Law
  • Communications & Internet Law
  • Intellectual Property
  • Appeals & Appellate
  • Business Law
  • Construction Law
  • Trademarks
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Most agreements will be based on a billable hour, but in some cases we do flat fees. As of 2016, my rate is $285 an hour. The firm works as a team, however, and each attorney's billing rate varies depending on experience.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Florida
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11th Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Lead Attorney
Cynthia Conlin & Associates
- Current
Law firm founder.
Education
Florida A&M University College of Law
J.D. (2007)
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Honors: Cum Lade
Activities: Law Review, Student Bar Association, Phi Alpha Delta, Women's Law Caucus
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University of Central Florida
B.A. (2002) | Journalism (News/Editorial)
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Professional Associations
Orange County Bar Association
Current
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Federal Bar Association
Current
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Cynthia Conlin & Associates
Legal Answers
5 Questions Answered

Q. Can you sue a family member for defamation or do they have different rules?
A: You can file a lawsuit against anyone. The rules are the same. However, the outcome, the stress, and experience can be very different when the defendant is a family member. Often, lawsuits should be considered as a last result.
Q. Is it true that it's harder for public figures to sue for defamation?
A: Yes it is a little harder because public figures have more factors to prove. The courts tend to distinguish between two types of Plaintiffs in defamation actions: “private individuals” and “public figures.” The difference in the way they are treated depends on the Defendant's knowledge in publishing the defamatory content. Private individuals need only establish that the publisher acted with "negligence." However, where public figures are concerned, the courts have found that there is a lessened interest in protecting the defamed subject's reputation. Therefore, public-figure plaintiffs must allege a higher level of knowledge. The United States Supreme Court case New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, 376 U.S. 254 (1964) established that a public figure plaintiff must establish what is known as “actual malice.” To show actual malice, the person who published the statement either had to have known that the statement was false, or published it with reckless disregard despite awareness of the probable falsity. The existence of actual malice must be proven by clear and convincing evidence.
Q. What should I do if I don't get the letter of settlement before my 2nd pretrial?
A: I'm guessing that you're talking about a small claims case. First, why not call whoever it was whom you made the payment arrangements to and ask them why you haven't received the settlement letter. Also, as Mr. Thorgaard answered, when you go to the pretrial conference, explain it to the court and to Plaintiff's attorney. Good luck.
Q. Can I use newspaper print for my art and then make prints of that completed work to sell?
A: As always, it depends. If you use a newspaper print that is original, recognizable content, you may be infringing on someone else's copyrighted work. If you're using small text for the background and it is not recognizable or original, then no. The question is whether the content you are using is "original" and whether it is recognizable. Text in a newspaper can be protected written work, while images in a newspaper can be protected visual works of art. Stock listings, however, in the business section, would probably not qualify as "original."
Q. I need to know if a declatory judgement is the proper procedural device to remove derogatory info off the internet in FL
A: As always, it depends. I am guessing that you are looking to remove a listing from Google search? If so, in that case, yes, you generally will need a declaratory judgment in a lawsuit in a case against the person who posted the derogatory information.
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Contact & Map
Cynthia Conlin & Associates
1643 Hillcrest Street
Orlando, FL 32803
USA
Telephone: (407) 965-5519