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Carrie Dyer

Carrie Dyer

Mansell Law
  • Employment Law
  • Northern District of Ohio, Ohio, Southern District of Ohio
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Summary

As a Columbus employment lawyer, Carrie represents clients in a wide variety of employment matters, including cases involving age discrimination, sexual harassment, race discrimination, disability discrimination, failure to accommodate a disability, and religious discrimination; ERISA employee benefits appeals and litigation; review of employment contracts, review of severance agreements and severance negotiation; wage and hour (unpaid overtime and minimum wage) matters under the Fair Labor Standards Act and various state laws, including collective action lawsuits. Carrie represents clients in jury trials, arbitrations, unemployment hearings, and hearings and mediations in front of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Carrie has been selected to be included on the Ohio Super Lawyers, Rising Stars list each year between 2016 - 2019.

Carrie grew up in Akron, Ohio. She earned her undergraduate degree from Wittenberg University, where she studied psychology and competed on the women’s basketball for all four years. Carrie received her J.D., summa cum laude, from Capital University Law School. She served two years on the Capital University Law Review.

Practice Area
  • Employment Law
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    We provide 30-minute free consultations.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Northern District of Ohio
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Ohio
Supreme Court of Ohio Office of Attorney Services
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Southern District of Ohio
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6th Circuit
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Associate Attorney
Mansell Law
- Current
Judicial Extern to the Honorable Judge James L. Graham
United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio
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Summer Associate
Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP
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Education
Capital University Law School
J.D. (2013)
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Honors: Carrie received her J.D., summa cum laude, from Capital University Law School. She served two years on the Capital University Law Review.
Capital University Law School Logo
Awards
Ohio Rising Star
Super Lawyers
Ohio Rising Star
Super Lawyers
Ohio Rising Star
Super Lawyers
Ohio Rising Star
Super Lawyers
Professional Associations
Ohio State Bar # 0090539
Member
Current
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American Bar Association
Current
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Ohio Employment Lawyers Association
Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
Mansell Law Blog
Mansell Law
Certifications
JD
Capital University Law School
Legal Answers
13 Questions Answered

Q. Unpaid work/hours at a job. Is it legal
A: The Fair Labor Standards Act requires that employers typically pay their employees time and one-half their regular rate of pay for all hours worked per week in excess of 40. Your entitlement to overtime is determined on a weekly basis, not daily. Unless you are subject to an exemption, if you are paid on an hourly basis and are not receiving overtime pay for hours worked beyond 40 each workweek, you likely have a claim for unpaid wages. You should immediately consult with an employment attorney.
Q. What can I do about not getting my pay check for work that I have completed?
A: You should immediately consult an employment law attorney in South Carolina to discuss your situation. You may have a claim for unpaid wages under the federal law (Fair Labor Standards Act) and state law.
Q. I was wrongful terminated on 6/27/19I've work in the same place 8yrs is it to late to look into doing something about it
A: The statute of limitations to bring an action depends on the legal claim. You should first consult a Wisconsin employment attorney about your situation to determine whether you have a legal claim. If you do, your attorney can help you determine how much time you have left to bring a claim.
Q. My employer mandated me at 50 hours per week. My check does not reflect my actual hours, it says a flat 40 a week, lega?
A: The Fair Labor Standards Act requires that employers typically pay their employees no less than minimum wage for all hours worked, and time and one-half their regular rate of pay for all hours worked per week in excess of 40. Unless you are subject to an exemption, if you are paid on an hourly basis and are not receiving at least minimum wage for all hours worked and overtime pay for hours worked beyond the 40 hours your employer is accounting for, you likely have a claim for unpaid wages. You should immediately consult with an employment attorney.
Q. I feel like I had no other option but to resign. When now I am out of a job
A: Additional information is needed to asses whether you have a potential legal claim. If you felt compelled to resign due to unlawful treatment in the workplace (e.g., discrimination due to your membership in a protected class or a hostile work environment), an employment law attorney can help you determine whether you can show that you were constructively discharged. You should reach out to an employment attorney to discuss your situation in detail.
Q. I carry specialized equipment to my work site everyday to perform inventory. This is company owned equipment I transport
A: It depends. If you drive from your home to your employer's office or warehouse to pick up the specialized equipment (without which you cannot perform your job duties), then drive to the work site from there, the Fair Labor Standards Act typically requires that you are paid for time spent loading the equipment into your vehicle and for the time spent driving from the employer's office or warehouse to your work site. On the other hand, if you drive directly from your home to your work site with the equipment, this time is typically not compensable. You should contact an employment attorney to discuss this further.
Q. My boss is aware that a customer sexually harasses his staff & doesnt care. Can I post that on fb w/ his name w/out gett
A: You should consult with an attorney who practices employment law in Tennessee prior to posting anything about your boss or his business on Facebook, even if you don't explicitly identify him or the company by name. Defamation laws are state-specific. An employment attorney will be able to help you understand your First Amendment rights, while ensuring you understanding the potential risk of litigation for posting such statements.
Q. Hey I was harassedat work also my store manager call someone to the store to confront me, in I awash the one Discipline
A: More information is needed to evaluate whether you have a legal claim. If you were subject to harassment on the basis of your membership in a protected class (e.g,. race, gender, age (40+), religion, disability), you reported the harassment, and your employer terminated you after making the report, you may have a retaliation claim. You should consult an employment attorney to have your situation evaluated.
Q. I really don't know where to start I've been working at this job for over 5 years 1 raise in 5 years getting harassed
A: If you feel you are being harassed because of your disability or your membership in another protected class (e.g., due to your gender, race, color, national origin, religion, or age (40+)), you should report the harassment in accordance with your employer's policies. If the harassment continues and your employer fails to take action, you should consult with an experienced employment law attorney to discuss further options.
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Contact & Map
Mansell Law LLC
1457 S. High Street
Columbus, OH 43207
USA
Telephone: (614) 610-9899